Commentary Drive A Proven System for Preventing Accidents

A commentary drive is where you describe what you are doing as you are driving. It’s a technique used by advanced drivers such as the police. This video shows a high speed commentary drive by a police officer through urban streets. Watch it a couple of times because the first time you’ll find that the officer is talking about things happening on the road that are far further up the road than you are looking, and you’re not even driving!

The purpose of a commentary drive is to train the driver to take in and process much more information than usual, and to anticipate danger. Once you start doing a commentary drive you will realise the enormous number of things that our brains process automatically every time we drive. By learning to process these distractions and potential dangers in a more efficient way you will be able to drive more safely.

At Fleet Driving Solutions our advanced driving instructors will be able to fine-tune where you are looking so that you are taking consideration of the most important things that are up ahead and you are choosing the correct speed. It will also teach you to ignore things that aren’t of importance so that you can remain focused on the things that are important.

The only way to get good at commentary drives is to practise. When you first start you it will seem like you are inundated with things to describe, but over time you will become fluent, like you would when learning a language.

For more details call 0203 633 4682 or 07919 193299

Choose your Attitude

Even the best of drivers can let their driving deteriorate when their attitude starts to slide.

What attitudes can turn a normally good driver into a risk-taking one?

  • A feeling that everyone is out to get me or hold me up.
  • Judgements about other driver’s actions ‘everyone else is a lousy driver‘ that leads to frustration.
  • Angry feelings that may have no connection with driving until you are behind the wheel like a fight with the boss, spouse, kids or co-worker.
  • A need to be right or ‘WIN‘ in a situation
  • Can you think of more?

These things are called personal factors and they influence our driving behaviour if we let them.

Attitudes are a combination of what we are thinking and feeling. These are things that we have control over at least to some degree. Someone, when regularly cultivates strong negative feelings and thinking including anger and blame, will often have what is called a ‘bad attitude‘ but this is just a reflection of their emotional state

What kind of driving behaviour can result from negative attitudes?

  • Aggressive driving like speeding or cutting others off.
  • Retaliation and road rage
  • Vehicle abuse
  • What others can you think of?

Taking personal responsibility for our thinking, feelings and attitudes is key to safe driving. When you are behind the wheel, it’s your responsibility to drive defensively regardless of the pressures that may invite you towards negative thinking and emotion.

If you believe yourself to be a good driver, realize that most others are not as skilled as you and give them a break!

Don’t expect perfection; in fact, expect poor driving from others and take the high road by not reacting negatively. Remind yourself about everything that you have to be grateful for in life. It sounds simplistic but if we forget that we have so much to be grateful for, and start focusing on the negatives, we can easily get caught up in an attitude slide.

  • Give the other person a break regularly and make sure that if someone gives you a break to return a friendly wave.
  • Remind yourself regularly that you are in control of your own emotional weather and that it’s your thinking that most determines if you have a sunny disposition or a stormy one!

Fleet Driving Solutions, providing fleet and advanced driving training services to companies throughout the UK. Call 0203 633 4682 or 07919 193299

 

Fuel Efficient Driving Tips

Switch off your engine

  • Many newer cars automatically turn off when stationary in neutral. If yours doesn’t, turn off your engine when you’ve stopped for a minute or so to save fuel.

Higher gear

  • Driving at lower revs reduces fuel consumption so change up a gear at around 2,000 RPM.

Drive smoothly

  • Assess the road ahead as much as possible to avoid unnecessary braking and acceleration, which increases the amount of fuel you use.

Slow down

  • Your fuel costs will increase the faster you drive so keep speeds reasonable.

Windows vs air conditioning

  • If you are traveling at low speed opening the windows is more efficient. If traveling at 60 miles per hour or above, closing the windows and using the air con will save you more.

Tyre pressures

  • Under-inflated tyres increase your fuel consumption and can be dangerous on the road so check them once a month and before long journeys.

Roof racks/boxes

  • Having these attached to your car when they’re not being used will increase drag and increase your fuel costs.

Lighten your load

  • Remove excess items from your car before traveling to reduce weight.

Fleet Driving Solutions, providing fleet driving training services to companies throughout the UK. Call 0203 633 4682